My Love Affair With Arteza Fineliner Pens

Arteza Fineliners, Jessica JewettIt was a total impulse buy a few months ago and here we are now. My honest confession is that I can’t stop using these pens. They live on my desk on a permanent basis. I’m regretting the fact that I only got the 24 set considering there is the glorious bounty of a 72 set too.

Essentially what you’re getting is a metal tin filled with a variety of colors in the 0.4 mm tip size. To compare with the Sakura Pigma Micron fine liner sizing system, these pens are the same as their 04 size. That means you won’t get the super fine line you can get with the smallest Micron pens but I think Arteza isn’t going for the smallest line. They’re going for something in between that appeals to some professional illustrators right down to people filling in coloring books to relax.

Arteza Fineliners, Jessica Jewett Arteza Fineliners, Jessica Jewett

Now let’s look at the claims Arteza makes about the 24-pen tin that I purchased. The inks in these pens are water-based, which means they are nor permanent like other fine liners. However, they are advertised as being made with non-smudging, odor-free, and acid-free ink. The nibs are long-lasting metal-clad encased tips for precise detailing with rulers and stencils. The triangular-shaped barrel is designed for a perfect grip with the added benefit that they won’t roll off desks or tables. Another claim states that they are ideal for left-handed use.

I can’t say whether these pens are good for right- or left-handed people because I draw with the tools in my mouth due to my disability. I can, however, say the barrel is one of the big reasons why I favor this pen. If you have a mobility impairment, it’s difficult to catch or grab rolling pens, so the triangle shape is easier to hold. The plastic is sturdy as well. I’ve been using these pens regularly for a few months and I haven’t managed to crack any of them yet. So the barrel design is a major pro on the decision whether to try these pens or not.

On the other hand, water-based ink can be a con in the decision-making process because a lot of illustrators out there who use ink often prefer alcohol-based ink. Personally, though, I haven’t found the ink problematic so far. I have found the ink mostly smudge-resistant, bright, strong, and smooth. Only one green pen has minor drag issues but I think that’s a fluke in my pack as opposed to anything reflective of the whole set. That one nib is a little stiff compared to the others. The difference is so minor that I only notice a little drag when I have to fill in a block of color. It is true that the inks are odor-free. I’ve never smelled anything when I use them. When I draw thin lines or fill in color, the ink does not bleed or move around my paper (so far I have used three kinds of paper – two white and one gray). Generally, the ink in these pens is fantastic quality.

Art By Jessica Jewett cropped-artbyjjlogo5.jpg
Forget-Me-Not Pentacle, Jessica Jewett Here are some of my experiments with the Arteza Fineliners.

I’m working on mock ups and ideas for logos, headers, etc., for my art shop, website, business cards, and general publicity. Since they’re just mock ups, they’re not final products. I still have a lot of ideas to sketch out, but that’s the great thing about these pens. You can do a lot of different art styles with them. If I had the bigger sets with more color choices, I could do a lot more too.

The pentacle is something I did for fun, for myself. Pentacles are symbols mostly used by Pagan people today, although they have been used in ancient Christianity and other religious paths as well. It’s important to know that the upright pentacle seen here is a symbol of spirituality, positivity, power, and harmony in  the universe. The inverted pentacle, meaning one turned upside down, is a symbol of the darker arts. They’re not the same.

And forget-me-nots are an important flower to me and I’ve been wanting to practice drawing them. Drawing flowers wreathing different objects has been an exercise of mine lately. I’ve been working on mastering nature, greenery, flowers, rocks, trees, and so on, so I thought the Arteza Fineliners would keep my practice sessions interesting. I respond to color. I’m very stimulated by it. These colors make practice work and experimentation fun for me.

I highly recommend these pens.

You can buy the Arteza Fineliners on their website in different sets ranging from 24 to 72 in number. Prices range from $7.99 to $16.57 on their website at the moment. Those are sale prices and are subject to change at any time.

This was not a sponsored blog. I bought these pens with my own money and I wanted to review them for those who have disabilities and are looking for good products.


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Struggling With the Witch Cottage Series

I had the bright idea in the autumn to start a series of highly detailed, realistic pencil drawings of domestic scenes based around my concept of how a witch lived during colonial America. It’s sort of fantasy, sort of ancestral reality, and altogether original. My goal was to complete one in time for each of the four seasons. Loosely, they would be themed around Samhain, the winter solstice (Yule to some), Imbolc into Ostara, and Beltane into Lughnasadh.

I have completed Samhain and Yule so far. I think Samhain was fairly easy because I hadn’t yet decided to make it a full series, so I wasn’t feeling any pressure. Samhain is my favorite period of the year too. I can whip out art along the themes in that season with my eyes closed. Take a look at the one that started my bright idea.

The Witch's Cottage, Jessica Jewett

Witch Cottage No. 1:

5×7 print on Etsy for $10.00
11×17 print on Etsy for $20.00
ORIGINAL PIECE SOLD

I’m really proud of that one. People often send me messages asking if I intentionally hid images in the fire or in the shelf. I didn’t, of course, but I adore the idea of people seeing things in my art that speak to them. It means I somehow tapped into some amazing creative energy.

Then I decided I would do it again. A story began to form in my mind because I spent so much time with the first piece and everybody loved it so much. I had to restock it three times, which has never happened in my little shop with another piece of art. The story took shape for a more formal room designed around the winter solstice, which doesn’t look very different from Christmas. The trouble was I tried to finish a major piece of art during the real holidays. I ran out of time! It was tough to balance home life with my artistic ambitions and I had to learn a tough lesson about best laid plans. Witch Cottage No. 2 wasn’t finished until after the solstice.

Witch Cottage No. 2, Jessica Jewett

Witch Cottage No. 2:

5×7 print on Etsy for $10.00
11×17 print on Etsy for $20.00
ORIGINAL PIECE on Etsy for $180.00

But I finished it and I think the challenge was good for me. I changed up my usual way of setting up a composition for domestic scenes. Everything was done to historical specifications regarding colonial America while adding subtle hints that a witch lives in that home. I had trouble though. It was tough to keep my perspective points straight and I still think I couldn’t get those points exactly right. One point perspective I’ve mastered pretty well but two point perspective or more still wreaks havoc on my dyslexia.

Still I’m pressing onward to new challenges. At the moment, I’m working on the third piece in my Witch Cottage series centered around the rebirth and renewed light during the period of Imbolc into Ostara. I had the fabulous idea of a greenhouse scene to show where the witch in this artistic story grows her plants, flowers, and herbs.

Again, I’ve run into delays and the sacred days have already come and gone. This time it was my health. Chronic pain is a companion to my disability and I had to have an invasive procedure this spring. I might even be looking at surgery this year too. So I’m doing my best to be kinder to myself about missing my self-imposed deadline because this is not something that could have been avoided.

Let’s take a look at my work-in-progress of Witch Cottage No. 3, shall we?

Witch Cottage No. 3, WIP, Jessica Jewett

I’m not sure how much you can decipher about what’s going on in this piece but you’re looking at the interior of a greenhouse. There are drying herbs strung across the top. A table and chairs are in the middle with a bench on the right. Through the open door will be a glimpse of the outside as well. I’m planning to set up an Imbolc altar on the table and maybe hide an ewe outside somewhere. We’ll see where things take me as I go. This one has been daunting because I rarely draw plants, but I’ve been practicing in other sketchbooks.

Of course, since I’ve made it this far, I can’t stop now. I don’t really want to stop either. I did not, however, believe I was going to be so challenged by this project. Once I’m done with Witch Cottage No. 4 in a few months (I haven’t yet decided how to depict summertime), I’ll be able to sit back and enjoy the fact that I succeeded at a challenge I set before myself almost six months ago.

Don’t get stagnate in your art. If you’re not feeling challenged, or you’re not slightly nervous about your work, then you’re not developing your skills. An artist needs constant growth in order to experience life at its fullest. Sometimes being nervous is a good thing because it makes your accomplishments all the more potent and special.


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My #CopicColors Challenge So Far

Last month, I came across an awesome art challenge on Instagram. I immediately wanted to get involved even though I was unaware of it until the second month, so I caught up quickly.

The challenge came about from the Copic brand of art supplies famous for their alcohol-based markers and fine liner pens among other things. On the first of each month, Copic announces three colors that we are to use to create art that month. It can be any kind of art we please but it has to be done only with the three colors they select (plus optional black or white pens for emphasis).

Copic Sea Ocean Markers

I used to be hesitant about using Copic markers. Okay, that’s not entirely accurate. I was afraid of using alcohol-based markers in general because I have to draw with my mouth. As most of you know, I have a disability that makes it impossible for me to draw or write or do anything else with my hands, which means I do those things with the tools in my mouth. If pens crack open or paintbrushes aren’t clean, I can ingest the ink or the paint or whatever, and I can get sick. But I was gifted a pack of ocean-toned Copic markers last summer, so I tried them out. Long story short, they are very well made and I’ve barely left teeth marks on the barrels whereas most markers or pens crack in the first use.

And when this drawing challenge came around, I got excited. I thought it would be fun to do an art project that a lot of other people were doing, like being part of a community.

I wanted to make sure, however, that being part of an art community didn’t compromise my artistic style. The truth is I’m not a typical artist. My subjects are almost always historical, inspired by feminine power in history, or reflective of my religious upbringing (I’m a witch raised by a witch). I knew whatever I did for the color challenge wasn’t going to be like the popular illustration style I’ve seen with Copic artists, nor did I want my art to fit into any mold.

Godey's Lady's Book, February 1856

In thinking about what I wanted to do for my year-long challenge, I only had to look to my antique book collection. I have a full year of Godey’s Lady’s Book from 1856. Godey’s was like a combination of Vogue and Martha Stewart Living for women of the nineteenth century. There are hand-colored fashion plates (like illustrating Vogue models, let’s say) that are stunning works of art to me. Just look at this one on the left from my book.

I love historical fashion plates and I wish we still used them. That was when it hit me. I can create fashion plates progressing from 1800 through the next twelve decades, but instead of copying the old style, I could use the Copic challenge to modernize it with color. I think there’s something interesting in exploring fashion history while layering it with modern color ideas.

Presto! My theme for this year-long project was born. I wrote it down to go like this:

January: 1800-1809
February: 1810-1819
March: 1820-1829
April: 1830-1839
May: 1840-1849
June: 1850-1859
July: 1860-1869
August: 1870-1879
September: 1880-1889
October: 1890-1899
November: 1900-1909
December: 1910-1919

It’s too bad we aren’t on a thirteen-month calendar because then I could have gone into flappers of the Jazz Age as my finale piece! Maybe I’ll do that for myself anyway after the rest of them are done.

Let’s look at the #CopicColor challenge pieces I’ve done so far. The paper I have been using with Copic markers is listed as the “Hammermill Paper, Color Copy Digital Cover, 100lb, 8.5 x 11” on Amazon. I was recommended that paper by Baylee Jae in one of her YouTube videos and I think it’s great for alcohol-based markers but not pencil art. It’s definitely best for ink. You get plenty for your money too.

Miss January – The Purple Lady of 1803

#CopicColors Miss January, Jessica JewettI found the inspiration for Miss January in a portrait from 1803 of a woman who actually lived at that time. I made her into a fashion plate instead of a painting, which created a new and different woman altogether. This was my first fashion plate illustration and I feel like I made some mistakes since I had no real experience before with this style. I’m honestly making it up as I go, which means I ought to be more forgiving of myself, but I’m very critical. I see lots of things that should have been done differently. Still, people seem to like it!

Miss January reminds me of Jane Austen, as does Miss February. You’ll see her in a second. All of Jane Austen’s stories took place in this period. Sometimes I call Miss January and Miss February the Jane Austen Girls.

January’s colors assigned by Copic for this art were B91, V17, and BV02. The only other tool I used was a Micron pen in size 02 for emphasis.

Buy Miss January:

5×7 print on Etsy for $10.00
11×17 print on Etsy for $20.00

Miss February – The Pink Lady of 1815

#CopicColors Miss February, Jessica JewettI’m personally very enamored of this one. I got the inspiration for Miss February from an illustration that was dated 1815, although I don’t know if it was an actual fashion plate or not. Sometimes artists just used the popular style of the period when they were doing pen and ink work. I think the original version was yellow but I might be mistaken.

Naturally I used the colors assigned to me instead and I changed some of the shapes. I’m not adept enough at this illustration style yet to draw it out of my head, hence the inspiration photos from the period. My goal is to be totally historically accurate down to the month if I can.

Miss February was specifically done this way to keep with the Valentine’s Day feeling. I like the way she’s gazing at a double portrait in her hands. I especially like the way she’s sitting incorrectly in her chair (according to etiquette at that time) because it tells me she’s a little bit of a rebel.

February’s colors assigned by Copic for this art were RV32, RV34, and E74. The only other tool I used was a Micron pen in size 02 for emphasis.

Buy Miss February:

5×7 print on Etsy for $10.00
11×17 print on Etsy for $20.00

Miss March – The Green Lady of 1822

#CopicColors Miss March, Jessica JewettI’d say this one has been the hardest for me to do so far. It was probably the plaid fabric that made me struggle as much as I did. I had trouble seeing where the natural skirt folds should be vs where the plaid pattern went. Green is a tough color for me to see for some reason. Multiple shades of green tend to blend into one bright shade if I’m not completely and utterly focused. I think I did fairly well, however.

The inspiration for Miss March did indeed come from a fashion plate dated 1822. I thought all of the foliage in this one made it nice for the green shades assigned to us, although the foliage was not colorized in the original. The first artist intended for the dress and hat (that feather!) to be front and center, so everything else was without color and distraction. I wanted Miss March to feel like a woodland nymph in a way.

March’s colors assigned by Copic for this art were G17, YG17, and YG23. The only other tool I used was a Micron pen in size 02 for emphasis.

Buy Miss March:

5×7 print on Etsy for $10.00
11×17 print on Etsy for $20.00

And there we have it! Those are all of the pieces I’ve done for the #CopicColors challenge up until the present. Sunday is April 1st, so we will most certainly receive our new color assignments that day unless Copic takes a day off for Easter. We’ll see!

I’m also tossing around the possibility of turning this series of illustrations into a calendar or maybe even a book of some kind. It all depends on what I feel after I have all twelve of them in front of me. It also depends on what interests my followers. Who knows? Maybe I’ll do a calendar and a book of short stories based on select illustrations. There are things that interest me about both ideas.

Keep checking back for more in this series!


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Video: Star Trek fan art

Recently, I posted a speed drawing video on my YouTube channel. Speed drawing videos are basically where you watch an artist complete a drawing without any tutorial tips. It’s sped up so you don’t have to watch hours and hours of tedious work that is, for the most part, only interesting to the artist.

This speed drawing was done as a birthday gift for my friend, Wendy. She was the one who took me on the Star Trek cruise at the beginning of January and we had a big discussion about whether Spock blushes green because Vulcans have green blood. Yes, we are a fabulous level of nerd. I told her I’d do a cartoon of Spock blushing green for her birthday when I got home again.

Cartoon illustrations are a weak area for me. I was trained in more of a classical, realistic style, which is why my illustrations look totally different than my “regular” art. I just haven’t had enough practice with this style to say I’m good at it.

Here’s the video.

And here is a photo of the finished illustration, which Wendy will own as soon as I get it mailed to her.

Jessica Jewett, Star Trek fan art
Star Trek fan art by Jessica Jewett. Copic Ciao markers, Tombow brush pens, Micron liner pens, and Prismacolor colored pencils on white 9 1/2 x 11 cardstock.

As always, if you enjoy my videos, please feel free to subscribe to my channel. I’m hoping to hit 1,000 subscribers this year. Your support means a lot to me!


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Video: All of my art done in 2017.

I wanted to put together a compilation video of all my various art projects in the last year. Hopefully if I do this right, you should be able to watch the video below. I’ll also provide a direct link to the YouTube page in case it doesn’t work here for you.

Looking back on it now, 2016-2017 has been my biggest period of growth since I was a student, as far as my technique development and my creative experimentation is concerned. This past year I tried playing with subjects and ideas that I never would have considered a few years ago because I used to be so stuck in the little box of what should be viewed as “fine art”. That can be a bit of a downside to being exposed to any sort of classical training. You do need those technical skills but you’re also at risk of falling into the us vs them trap of what’s real art and what’s not. I’m happy to say that I think I’ve grown beyond that trap and I’m much more willing to experiment these days.

Now, let’s see if I can post the video here.

Here’s the direct link: https://youtu.be/Vo4z4gJbdq8

As always, if you enjoy my videos, please feel free to subscribe to my channel. I’m hoping to hit 1,000 subscribers this year. Your support means a lot to me!


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That time Jonathan Frakes saw me doing really terrible art, but it was okay.

Imagine, if you will, lying by a glorious swimming pool on a warm, sunny afternoon. You’re an artist, which means you carry around pencils and sketchbooks the way other people carry around gum and loose change. Since you’re on vacation, you’re hoping to sketch without the pressure of perfection. The coast of Belize is behind you. The breeze is a welcome relief from the humidity.

Jessica Jewett in Belize.
Jessica Jewett drawing on the Norwegian Jade off the coast of Belize.

Ah, there’s the happy place. You pull out your pencil bag and you begin sketching for no real artistic value – just for your own love of color and light. It’s a terrible sketch that you decide to redo properly once you’re at home with your “real” supplies. This is why you became an artist in the first place. Colors are stimulating and having total control over the story in your sketchbook is the most liberating feeling in a life that often makes you feel trapped in a wheelchair seat belt.

And then, it happens. You feel footsteps close by on the pool deck, so you look up and there he is fussing with his cell phone.

He’s your favorite.

He’s the reason you’re on this ship in the first place.

And he’s coming closer with the warmest grin despite being on the phone, because he remembers you as the lady with the smile and the lovely perfume from the previous night. A toxic sensation of dread and elation washes over you, leaving you rigid and unable to do anything but smile. You don’t want this charming human to see your terrible art lying innocently on the pool chair in front of you because you know you’re capable of so much more. The chance to be impressive is slipping through your fingers.

What’s worse is suddenly realizing your pencil is poking out of your mouth like a blueberry cigarette. You can’t spit it out right there in front of him. That’s so unladylike. Yet you wonder with certain horror if he’s silently trying to piece together why you’re on you’re stomach drawing with your mouth rather than your hands.

I can explain! I’m really a much better artist than this! Let me show you my gallery pieces!

It reverberates in your brain at the same rhythm as his approaching footsteps. Panic begins to bloom in your throat. He’s looking at you in your most vulnerable position, seeing you work with the pencil in your mouth because the universe never gave you the use of your hands. You’ve struggled your whole life to allow people to see you actively being different and he has no idea that it was an internal battle just to come out to the pool deck and draw in front of strangers.

Don’t stop. Please keep walking. But no, wait. You’re my favorite. I want to talk with you and take a photo together. Stay for a minute. Just don’t look at me with pity.

You manage to croak out something resembling, “Hello!” instead.

“Good afternoon,” he says in his cheerful way through his charming smile.

He’s disappearing into the crowds and the moment lets go of your throat. You breathe, torn between thanking the gods and goddesses that he was too busy with a phone call to stop more than a second, and wishing his call had come later so you might have enjoyed a few more seconds of your favorite.

A little while later, you peer down at your horrible sketch and you decide to finish it anyway. Screw it. Jonathan Frakes remembered you from last night. You’re a goddamn queen for a day.

Jessica Jewett, Belize sketch
“The Day Frakes Walked By” by Jessica Jewett. It reads: Upon this day on the ship Jade, whilst sketching the coast of Belize, Jonathan Frakes not only walked by my pool chair twice but remembered me from last night’s meeting. I am the lady with the smile and the good perfume. Always remember Jonathan Frakes likes J’adore by Dior. This sketch is really terrible too but thankfully he didn’t look too close. Oh, and Brent Spiner walked by my pool chair too.

And this, my friends, has been a dramatic retelling of my ten-second encounter with Jonathan Frakes. I wrote it to be tongue-in-cheek but I really did want to tell this story because every type of artist has intense insecurity sometimes, especially faced with another artist that they admire. Intimidation can be very toxic to a person’s creative energy in some ways but it can also push people to do better and challenge themselves more. It just depends on how you channel feelings of intimidation.

The truth is Frakes probably didn’t even notice my odd little setup that afternoon by the pool. If he did, nothing about it struck him as odd. He never stared or flinched or made faces like what the hell is going on here like some other people have done in my past. My tongue-in-cheek story is really a commentary on how we can talk ourselves into believing we’re being judged when that’s the farthest thing from the truth.

So be careful of that toxic thought spiral if you’re an artist. Not everything you do needs to be perfect. Not every artist needs to be perceived as perfect all the time because that’s simply not possible. Doing occasional “bad” art without the pressure to create a masterpiece actually makes you better at your craft.

Here we are in the full shot with my friends Dmitri and Wendy. I love Frakes so much that Wendy gave up her photo op tickets with Gates McFadden so I could meet him. That’s a true friend.

And I’m a true artist even if I was seen doing bad art.

Jessica Jewett, Jonathan Frakes
Jessica Jewett with Jonathan Frakes and friends, Dmitri and Wendy, on the Star Trek cruise in January 2018.

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Goals for 2018

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. I do, however, believe in mapping out goals for the year and checking back every so often to see which ones get accomplished. A lot of these are related to art but some are about my writer life as well. Some combine the two halves of who I am. Still others are about personal growth, which we should all strive for on a daily basis.

In no particular order, here are my goals for 2018.

1. Finish novel Exile to the Water’s Edge.
2. Finish the Witch Cottage art series.
3. Teach online class about American witchcraft.
4. Be a better friend.
5. Begin paintings for art book about decaying plantations.
6. Learn embroidery and crochet.
7. Get better at cooking.
8. Visit more Civil War sites.
9. Work more on my family Grimoire.
10. Be brave and try public transportation.
11. Try acrylic painting again.
12. Continue work on book about my ghost encounters.
13. Remember to stop and breathe.
14. Take better care of my health.
15. Forgive myself more often.
16. Improve figure drawing skills.
17. Spend more time drawing from life.
18. Be braver about artistic subjects that matter to me.

I’ve already begun working on my goals about improving my skills and being braver about my subjects. This is my newest piece of art in my sketchbook completed just a few days ago. She is a reflection of myself in the 18th century using a photo of a living historian for reference but changed at my own discretion. This is brave for me because of the way I drew it and what materials I used. I think it turned out well.

Celine II, Jessica Jewett
Celine II. Graphite pencil, and black and white charcoal pencils on mixed media paper. 2017.

What are your goals for 2018? Tell me about them in the comments.


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Inktober 2017: Week 1

Well everybody, we’ve survived the first week of Inktober – those of us who are participating, anyway. If you’re scratching your head at just what I’m talking about, Inktober is an activity that artists do to get to know each other and see new artists in the online world. Every day during the month of October, artists complete an ink drawing and post it online for everybody to see. There is an official prompt word list if people need inspiration but so far I haven’t needed it.

005 Micron Pen, Jessica Jewett This is my second year participating in Inktober, although I didn’t finish last year. I made it halfway through the month, and then I caught a really heinous cold … or maybe it was a sinus infection. I can’t remember. Needless to say, I didn’t finish so I was very determined to finish this year. Not only finish but create a body of work that challenged and stretched my artistic abilities.

Stretching my skills first involved gathering the right materials. My favorite drawing pens are the Micron variety. Copic makes a very similar line of pens but I haven’t ever found them at prices that don’t make me curl up into the fetal position. Micron pens come in several sizes and colors. The most common sizes I reach for are the .45 mm (05) and the .30 (02), both in black. I’ve got a set of colored ones but I haven’t used them yet. I’m enjoying the limited color palette I’m using in my Inktober sketchbook this year, which is mainly black with some light flesh shades and purples. The colors I’m using are the Copic Ciao markers. Those are alcohol-based and some of the ink is bleeding through onto the next page of my sketchbook. If this was a professional job meant to be sold, I’d care more, but as it is, this is only for me to play around and try out different illustration styles to see what I can do.

On the fifth day, I did get a stomach bug. Go figure. I always have some illness or another (compromised immune system) but I pressed ahead anyway. I’m still on schedule! That fact alone makes me very proud of myself. The sixth and seventh drawings are not exactly up to par with my intended plans because I wasn’t feeling well but they’re still worth keeping in my opinion.

Here are days one through seven of my Inktober 2017.

Meet the Artist, Inktober
Days one and two are two-panels introducing the artist. It features a section of what’s in my bag, my religious symbols, likes, dislikes, and a self-portrait.
Witch, Inktober
Day three was my interpretation of a movie still from Snow White.
Pagan Altar, Inktober
Day four was me experimenting with shapes, and light and shadow with ink, which is not something I’ve mastered yet. It turned into a pagan altar featuring a god and goddess statue, a bowl with burning herbs, a crystal ball, a scrying mirror, a bell, wine, and flowers.
Witch Hazel, Inktober
Day five came as a special request by a friend. This is my interpretation of Witch Hazel, another old Disney character.
Witch Potion, Inktober
Day six got harder because I was sick. I drew a fictional advertisement for a potion to make magic powers stronger and more stable. I drew inspiration from old Victorian tonics sold in newspapers and magazines.
Chains, Inktober
Day seven was a look at what I feel like some days with my disability. I live in a body that doesn’t function like it should and I go through periods of feeling like I’m in prison.

So far I do feel like Inktober has been a valuable experience, especially because it’s forcing me to learn a medium I don’t normally employ. We’ll see how I feel when I come back to post days eight through fourteen though!

Are you doing Inktober? Show me your work!


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I’m doing Inktober 2017!

Did you know I’m participating in Inktober this year? Inktober is an activity for artists to share each other’s work and get to know one another. Every day in the month of October, the artist draws something in ink and posts it online. I got this 5×7 sketchbook for Inktober 2017 and I did the introductory drawing to make sure the paper will work with Micron pens. So far so good! No bleed-through yet.

Jessica Jewett, Inktober

Since I’m a disabled artist (I’m a quadriplegic drawing with my mouth), I probably won’t be able to post a drawing video on YouTube every day like other artists do. I think once a week is more reasonable for me. However, I will post all of my daily drawings on my Instagram, which you can find at jj9828.

My Inktober sketchbook is going to be themed along the lines of Halloween, Samhain, spooky, autumn, fall, etc. You get the idea. My materials will be Micron pens, Copic markers, Arteza brush pens, Tombow brush pens, and a Pentel brush pen.

Do you have ideas of what drawings I could do in my little Inktober book? Tell me!

I hope you guys are going to enjoy it starting on October 1! You’ll need to follow these spots to see my daily Inktober posts.

Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/jj9828
YouTube: http://youtube.com/honeysuckle1825


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Finding my darker niche. Let’s talk about authenticity.

It’s been a little while since I last blogged (except for my Arteza brush pen review earlier this week!) but it’s all for a good reason. In the last couple of months, I’ve been working very hard building my artistic style. Almost by accident, I discovered that I’m great at expressing ideas and aesthetics related to my spiritual path as a pagan woman.

Jessica Jewett, artI’ve been tapping into my spirituality to create more interesting art and touching the deeper, more authentic part of myself has resulted in more self-fulfillment. It happened because I was starting to feel my creativity dry up and that’s a dangerous thing for any artist. Part of me was starting to fall into the trap of creating what I thought people wanted instead of engaging the people who find passion in the same things I do. I thought I was simply taking time to make art that I care about without any plan for engaging people. As it turns out, I’ve engaged many more people because I’m showing more of who I am. Authenticity is what makes an artist great. I’ve found that an artist can have all the technical skills in the world, which I certainly don’t, but it won’t mean anything unless the creative process comes from a real, true place inside.

In August, I was reading about the Otherworld in ancient Irish tradition, which is (without going too deep) the old Irish interpretation of the afterlife. Ancestor worship is a big part of my spiritual tradition. I’m one of those people who enjoys visiting cemeteries – the older the better! – and I think some of the most beautiful places are where we honor our dead. That led to creating this piece. It sold within fifteen minutes of posting that it was finished and (maybe) there will come prints out of it. All because I decided to try making art that was interesting to me!

The Cemetery At Night, Jessica Jewett
The Cemetery At Night is 11×14 on mixed media paper, drawn in black charcoal, white charcoal, and graphite pencil.

Is it perfect? No. I think what people responded to the most was the way I showed my passion for what I was doing, and that’s something to think about for any artist.

So I tried it again. My next project for most of September was something I’ve wanted to do for a while. Since we’re getting close to the Halloween season (Samhain for me), I’ve been watching a lot of witchy movies like Hocus PocusPractical Magic, and The Craft. I find the fictional witch aesthetic really fun and I’ve been feeling the urge to add my own contributions to that image.

I came up with a witchy hearth based on 18th century colonial homes. Like, how would a witch decorate her cottage in the colonial frontier? I thought most of his or her belongings would be functional to their craft but even functional things have their beauty. Improving my skills in drawing different textures has been more fun because I enjoyed the subject. I learned a lot about the texture of wood, stone, fabric, and the need to maintain good one-point perspective.

The Witch's Cottage, Jessica Jewett
The Witch’s Cottage is 11×14 and it was done on mixed media paper, drawn with charcoal pencil and graphite pencil.

Once again, this piece sold within minutes of completion. I was shocked! A lot of my audience has been finding things in this piece that I never intentionally placed but I don’t dare mess with those things now. People tell me most often that they see a face in the hearth fire, while others say they see the silhouette of a witch in the shadows in the back of the second shelf.

Beginning this journey into doing art that I thought was only interesting to me has been an eye-opening experience. It’s fun for me to do pieces with a lot of detail and show imagery related to my spirituality while combining it with occasional fun and fantasy, and especially history. This is who I am and I was afraid of showing it for so long.

That’s the moral of this story. You may find yourself falling into the same people-pleaser trap if you’re not careful. Things you create might be what’s popular or trendy at the moment and you may produce technically beautiful things but there will always be something missing. It’s almost a sixth sense thing with the people looking at your art. If they don’t “smell” your soul on it, they’re not going to be as responsive to what you’re offering as an artist, writer, musician, or whatever it is that you do.

But the second you allow your personal authenticity to come though, people will start engaging with you even more. My darker themes or pagan themes certainly won’t appeal to a wide audience but the people out there who are like me will and do respond at a much higher rate.

No matter how odd you think you are, there are always people like you. Be yourself.


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